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Georgia Military Town Overcomes Stormwater Rehabilitation Challanges

Stormwater Magazine - January-February 2012

Click to read complete article (pdf)Georgia Military Town Overcomes Stormwater Rehabilitation Challanges

Warner Robins, GA, is a military town named in honor of Brigadier General Augustine Warner Robins. The city is built around Robins Air Force Base, Georgia’s largest employer.

Its military background has had consequences for the town’s infrastructure. Rapid wartime expansion meant that sewers and other assets were put in quickly, with relatively little planning or inspection. As a result, “We have a lot of older corrugated metal pipe [CMP] storm sewer, even under roads,” says stormwater management technician Krag Woodyard. As a result, and also due to EPA mandates, the city is now struggling with major rehabilitation challenges.

“We’ve divided our stormwater system into five sectors, and we need to address one each year in order to keep up with EPA requirements,” explains Woodyard. This means he has to be organized and diligent. Inspection teams pull up to 60 manholes daily and inspect inlets and outlets as well. Flow direction is determined, condition assessed, and the amount of debris and blockage estimated. Using a handheld tablet, the results are noted and later uploaded to an office GIS. The result is a good record of a failing system; Warner Robins has a great deal of aging infrastructure, and there is much work to be done. Because there is too much work for one big project, tasks need to be prioritized.

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Case Studies - Latest
Click to view document (pdf)Click to view presentation (pdf) Trenchless sotrm sewer rehabilitation on Hilton Head Island
Hilton Head Island is a resort town off the coast of South Carolina. At 55.5 sq miles, it is a big island—second only to Long Island, N.Y., as the largest island on the East Coast. It also is big economically. Tourism brings in about $1.5 billion annually, and much of the island is covered in gated communities and golf courses. Infrastructure is a little haphazard because of rapid growth. The town was not incorporated until 1983, but has been developed since the late 1950s, mostly in the form of private resorts that did not apply common standards or coordinate large projects. As a result, the town faces some chronic infrastructure maintenance issues.

Click to view document (pdf)Click to view presentation (pdf) Rehabilitating a city sewer system with centrifugally cast concrete pipe!
About 18 months ago, when he was just settling into his new job as Storm Water and Conservation Superintendent of Hays, Kan., Nicholas A. Willis decided to take a closer look at the storm water sewers underneath the picturesque brick streets in the city's center. He knew from records that the sewer was 48-in. arched corrugated metal pipe (CMP), and a little over 50 years old. Because that is nearing the maximum lifespan for CMP, Willis was not expecting to find pipe in perfect condition. Still, what he did find surprised him.

Click to read complete article (pdf)Click to view presentation (pdf) Handling Wet, Emergency Conditions
Stormwater Magazine
January / February 2013

by Don Talend
The intersection of Routes 9 and 440 with the Garden State Parkway is one of New Jersey's busiest and most vital cloverleaf complexes. Sinkholes began to appear there after Hurricane Irene in 2011.
Case Studies - Archives
Click to read complete article (pdf)A Top Notch Ski Resort Uses Top Notch Trenchless Technology in Major Culvert Rehabilitation 
Smuggler’s Notch ski resort, near Jeffersonville, Vermont, was established in 1956 and is New England’s fourth largest resort area. It is built around Morse, Madonna, and Sterling Mountains. Record storms in the Northeast, and the resulting record snowmelt, caused near flooding at Smuggler’s Notch and two 72-inch ‘boilerplate’ culverts, each 130 feet long, were filled to near capacity with fast moving water.

Click to read complete article (pdf)Traffic Never Stopped: Creative Solution Builds New Box Culvert — From Within! 
The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) knew that the big box culvert running under State Road 64, in Manatee County in downtown Bradenton, absolutely had to be replaced or rehabilitated — but how? For structural reasons, replacement seemed like the best choice, but shutting down this major commuting route was ruled out by city, county, and state officials.

Click to read complete article (pdf)Rehabilitating large inverted siphons in Louisiana 
CStormwater - July / August 2011 - Angus W. Stocking
The Sabine River Authority (SRA) was created in 1949 to equitably distribute the waters of the Sabine River and its tributaries. As part of this distribution, “We provide surface water to 11 industrial customers, such as Conoco and Louisiana Pigment, for cooling and processing,” says SRA facility manager Mike Carr."

Click to read complete article (pdf)MOP 120 Trenchless Renewal 
ASCE Pipelines 2010 Conference
Climbing New Peaks to Infrastructure Reliability. Renew, Rehab and Reinvest; MOP 120 Trenchless Renewal of Culverts & Storm Sewers; Shotcrete Lining; Centrifugally Cast Pneumatically Gunned.

Click to read complete article (pdf)Working in the Bayou 
T.V. Diversified completes a difficult junction box rehabilitation in a short time frame.
Repairing and relining large sewer lines is always a serious undertaking, especially when the lines in question run underneath a Texas bayou. Repipe Texas, a national CIPP contractor, was working on such a project when they ran into a serious snag; after designing and installing a temporary bypass system involving six high-volume diesel pumps and four temporary lines, system engineers were surprised to discover that a critical concrete junction box was badly decomposed by microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) and in danger of failing structurally. To keep this major infrastructure project on track, the box needed to be cleaned and rehabilitated in a very short time frame, while CIPP work continued. Repipe called on T.V. Diversified, a South Florida based trenchless rehabilitation contractor, to complete the difficult project under extreme time pressure.

Click to read complete article (pdf)South Dakota Town Replaces Severely Corroded Manholes 
ConmicShield Technologies, Inc.
The manholes located in a small community just north of Sioux Falls called Renner, South Dakota, were badly deteriorated from high levels of acid produced from Microbiologically Induced Corrosion (MIC). Unprotected concrete can be damaged in just a few short years in these conditions.

Click to read complete article (pdf)City of Westlake Presentation - Sanitary Hydrogen Sulfide Corrosion Rehabilitation 
Presented by: Robert P. Kelly, P.E., Director Of Engineering, City Of Westlake
James J. Smolik, P.E., Engineer-City Of Westlake.

Click to read complete article (pdf)Miami-Dade Specifies ConmicShield® for New Manholes and Pipe 
ConmicShield Technologies, Inc.
Miami-Dade, Florida, has an area where levels of Hydrogen Sulfide Gas are extremely high. When unprotected concrete is exposed to hydrogen sulfide gas, Thiobacillus bacteria can create sulfuric acid that causes severe levels of structural damage from corrosion in a very short time.

Click to read complete article (pdf)Preventing Sewer Corrosion 
Publicworks Magazine
Precasters take biology lessons to increase the life of concrete sewer systems. About 40% of the more than 20,000 wasterwater systems in the United States are concrete. Corrosion severely compromises the structural integrity of these concrete components, costing million sin repairs.

Click to read complete article (pdf)Innovative anti-microbial product for a challenging concrete pipe installation 
CPI - Concrete Plant International - 01/2010
The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District (MSD) faced a problem familiar to many big city wastewater departments managing underground assets. A large (72-inch) sanitary sewer needed to be replaced with an even larger line to handle wet weather flows and eliminate sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs). In the years since initial installation, the above-ground area had become heavily developed. “We’re handling the Coldwater Creek project in three phases,” explains MSD Principal Engineer Greg Tolcou, P.E., “and this phase is the shortest. It is a 2,300-foot stretch that passes (at an average depth of 20-25 feet to flow line) under Lindbergh Boulevard. It also passes under a 20-inch gas line, a 24-inch water main, a condominium complex lake, the parking lot and the improvements for a driving range. The projected cost to restore surface disruptions is getting so high on these kinds of projects that tunneling is becoming more and more cost effective.”

Click to read complete article (pdf)Anti-Microbial Additive Helps Concrete Survive in Sewer Project 
WaterWorld - Editorial Feature
The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District (MSD) faced a problem familiar to many big city wastewater departments managing underground assets. A large (72-inch) sanitary sewer needed to be replaced with an even larger line to handle wet weather flows and eliminate sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs). In the years since initial installation, the above-ground area had become heavily developed. “We’re handling the Coldwater Creek project in three phases,” said MSD Principal Engineer Greg Tolcou, P.E., “and this phase is the shortest. It is a 2,300-foot stretch that passes (at an average depth of 20-25 feet to flow line) under Lindbergh Boulevard. It also passes under a 20-inch gas line, a 24-inch water main, a condominium complex lake, the parking lot and the improvements for a driving range. The projected cost to restore surface disruptions is getting so high on these kinds of projects that tunneling is becoming more and more cost effective.”

Click to read complete article (pdf)Rehabilitation Incorporates ConmicShield® to Indefinitely Extend Life of Maline Structure in St. Louis 
ConmicShield Technologies, Inc.
The Maline Drop Shaft located near the Chain of Rocks Bridge is just like concrete sewer structures everywhere. They corrode when hydrogen sulfide gas is present. Moderately-high temperatures, long retention times, high biological oxygen demand (BOD) levels, and turbulence contribute to elevated levels of hydrogen sulfide gas which, in turn, provide the food for acid-producing bacteria. The technical name for this process is Microbiologically Induced Corrosion (MIC). This 40-year-old concrete structure was severely deteriorated from MIC. The upper portion of the walls were mushy with more than two inches of the original wall missing; in the lower half of this 50-feet-deep structure, more than five inches of the walls had corroded away.

Click to read complete article (pdf)Manholes Take Center Stage in Chicago 
Trenchless Technology - April 2010
$60 million project under way using advanced mortar for rehab work. Chicago began the project four years ago and is now rehabilitating thousands of manholes annually. With a population of approximately 2.8 million, Chicago is the third largest city in the United States. The city's masive storm and sewer system includes more than a quarter million manholes and catch basins. Tens of thousands of the manholes are nearly 100 years old, and the bricks or blocks they are made of are held together with small amounts of mortar -- most need repair and many are close to failing.

Click to read complete article (pdf)Casa Grande, Arizona Solves Corrosion in Manholes 
ConmicShield Technologies, Inc.
The city of Casa Grande, Arizona is located in the one of the fastest growing areas of the USA, about midway between Phoenix and Tucson. While new sewer and water lines are being installed rapidly for new developments, older sections still needed work on some badly deteriorated manholes. Manholes deteriorate from a variety of serious problems; but, in the desert southwest, microbiologically induced corrosion is the primary reason for decay of the concrete in sewers. Microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) can happen anywhere that hydrogen sulfide gas is produced. Hydrogen sulfide gas is the food for T. bacteria and the worse it is, the more bacteria there are to generate sulfuric acid to eat the concrete.

Click to read complete article (pdf)Grand Rapids Eight-Year Test - Grand Rapids, Michigan 
ConmicShield Technologies, Inc.
Eight-year test concludes ConmicShield® treated concrete is superior to Calcium Aluminate cement in severe sulfide conditions. In 1999 the city of Grand Rapids, Michigan, under the direction of Chuck Schroeder, city engineer, embarked on a study to determine the optimal method for preventing concrete corrosion in sanitary manholes due to hydrogen sulfide gas. Turbulence, moderatelyhigh temperatures, and septic sewage create conditions that are ideal for sulfuric acid (H2SO4) production. Sulfuric acid is formed when aerobic (air-breathing) bacteria on the walls of the manholes metabolize hydrogen sulfide gas and oxygen. Their waste by-product is sulfuric acid, which results in the rapid decay of concrete. The technical name of this process is microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC). 

Click to read complete article (pdf)Manhole Rehab in Virginia - PERMACAST® 
Trenchless Technology - April 2008
The City of Hampton, Virginia, covers approximately 136 square miles in the Hampton Roads area. With a population of 150,000 people, Hampton is the home of the Langley Air Force Base and Space Center. It also boasts a wide variety of business, industrial, retail and residential areas, historical sites and miles of beaches. The urban waterfront city is becoming a hot spot for tourists on the East Coast.

Click to read complete article (pdf)Hampton Discovers the Benefit of Using  PERMAFORM® with ConmicShield® 
ConmicShield Technologies, Inc.
In 2000, the manholes near City Hall in Hampton, Virginia, were identified as being severely deteriorated from high levels of hydrogen sulfide gas which fed bacteria to form Microbiologically Induced Corrosion. When unprotected concrete is exposed to Hydrogen Sulfide Gas, bacteria can quickly grow creating sulfuric acid which allows structural damage in just a few short years. This was the case in the City of Hampton. The City of Hampton chose to fix the manhole on Queens Way using a process called PERMAFORM® fortified with ConmicShield® PERMAFORM® is a unique, patented process for reconstructing manholes quickly and cost-effectively, involving neither excavation nor interruption of the flow.

Click to read complete articleCity Innovates in Manhole Rehabilitation - Lexington, Missouri
George Downs, CET
Lead Project Designer, George Butler Associates

Lexington, Missouri is a historical river town (population, 5,000) with many 19th century homes and historical sites. The City of Lexington recently completed a successful manhole rehabilitation program, reducing I/I while minimizing cost. A total of 75,000 lf of sewer vitrified clay pipe and brick manholes is located in the historical downtown district. The city has retained the services of Alliance Water Resources Inc. to operate and maintain the sanitary sewer system. In response to sewer backups and overflows during wet weather, the city retained George Butler Associates Inc. of Lenexa, Kansas to complete a sewer system evaluation study (SSES) in the fall of 1997. The study area included the historical downtown and surrounding areas.

 

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